We have identified over 650 questions and answers concerning many of the topics featured on this site. The information is categorised and can be reached by navigating via the entries below.

Information can also be retrieved using the Search box. This will search through the entire list of FAQ entries (in the Title and the Body) and will return results based on a match based on the words you input. If you wish, you may enter complete questions, e.g. "What currency would we use in an independent Scotland".

Postal Services

What is the plan for the newly privatised Royal Mail in an independent Scotland?

The current Scottish Government disagrees with the recent privatisation of Royal Mail. Independence will enable Scotland to restore the Royal Mail to public ownership in Scotland and the current Scottish Government intends to do so.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will universal postal services be maintained in an independent Scotland?

Yes. This Scottish Government recognises the importance of postal services to sustaining communities across Scotland, and will maintain at least the level of service provision inherited from the United Kingdom on independence.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will the price for stamps be higher in an independent Scotland than in the rest of the UK?

On independence, stamp prices will be the same as they are at the time in the rest of the UK. A Scottish postal service in public ownership would not need to generate profits for shareholders and so should be in a better position to ensure that postal prices and deliveries meet Scotland’s needs. This applies to sending post and parcels within Scotland, to the rest of the UK and to other countries.

We know that many people and businesses will continue to send post and parcels outside Scotland and it is our intention that postal charges to the rest of the UK will not be more expensive than charges to send post within Scotland.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Communications

Will I have to pay roaming charges on my mobile phone in other parts of the UK?

No. There will be no international roaming charges across Scotland and the rest of the UK. There is no reason why companies would wish to frustrate customers on either side of the border by introducing charges.

The EU has cut charges for international voice calls, texts and internet access by 75 per cent since 2007, and the European Commission has recently published proposals to ban incoming call charges while travelling in the EU from 1 July 2014, and to abolish all other mobile roaming charges by 2016.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will I have to pay international rates to phone the rest of the UK on a landline?

No. People in Scotland and the rest of the UK will not be subject to international rates on a fixed landline.

The European Commission has recently published proposals that would mean companies cannot charge more for a fixed call within Europe than they do for a long distance domestic call.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will my home phone number change as a result of Scotland becoming an independent country?

No. Independence will not result in any change to local phone numbers and dialling codes for areas across Scotland (such as 01224 for Aberdeen and 01698 for Motherwell).

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What will the international dialling code be for an independent Scotland?

When Scotland becomes independent, we will seek to ensure that Scotland continues to use the 0044 international dialling code, through the International Telecommunication Union. This would be similar to the current use of the 001 international dialling code which is shared by a number of North American countries including Canada and the USA.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will 3G and 4G internet still be available on my mobile phone in an independent Scotland?

Yes. Powers over this issue, currently exercised by Westminster, will transfer to Scotland as a result of independence. This Scottish Government would prioritise enhancements to mobile phone coverage in an independent Scotland.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What impact will independence have on investment in broadband infrastructure and in satellite broadband technologies?

Public investment in broadband infrastructure at a UK level is fragmented. For example, Westminster is delivering a number of programmes – a rural broadband fund, a super-connected cities fund, and a mobile infrastructure fund.

These projects are being administered separately. They have different aims and objectives and are not fully aligned with each other. The overall investment made by Westminster is not being utilised to maximum impact. With independence, the Scottish Government will have the opportunity to direct these resources more effectively within Scotland.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

What will happen to the UK internet domain name registration process?

There will be no impact on the UK internet domain name registration processes or the cost to businesses as anyone in the world can apply to use dotUK.

Prior to independence, a new dotSCOT top level domain will have been established and will be open to registrations from businesses, organisations and individuals from Scotland and to those with a clear Scottish connection.

An independent Scotland would also be entitled to a new two-letter country code top-level domain once new codes are in place with the International Standardization Organisation.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

IT Infrastructure and Data

What arrangements will be made to “share” or migrate systems with existing Westminster Government departments which currently hold data on individuals, such as on social security and tax systems?

On independence, the short-term delivery of central government IT services would remain as it currently stands. We would work closely with Westminster departments, as envisaged in the Edinburgh Agreement, to support the best interests of the people of Scotland and the rest of the UK through continuity of service and to identify and scope any transition to new systems. This would also look at the potential for sharing existing systems, both short-term and longer-term.

The Scottish Government would look to put in place a memorandum of agreement with each of the UK departments to ensure there would be a clear understanding that data relating to Scottish citizens is entirely the responsibility of an independent Scotland, and to set out the standards required from UK departments for as long as they continue to act as processors of the data.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will independence mean there will be extra costs in terms of IT systems for public services?

There will be transitional costs, the level of which will depend on arrangements reached with Westminster on sharing. Independence provides an opportunity to develop better integrated IT systems for public services.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Will Scotland continue to have all internet traffic routed via London, or will it be necessary to create a Scottish internet hub, with direct connectivity to mainland Europe?

This is not affected by independence and will depend on whether current connectors, mainly through London, have the bandwidth to meet the needs of Scottish businesses as they do currently. The Scottish Government has worked with industry to help create an internet exchange in Scotland, which launched in October 2013. The internet exchange point allows internet traffic to be routed through Scotland more efficiently and cost effectively, allowing Scottish businesses to connect directly to the internet more cheaply and easily, and increasing the resilience of internet infrastructure in Scotland.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.