We have identified over 650 questions and answers concerning many of the topics featured on this site. The information is categorised and can be reached by navigating via the entries below.

Information can also be retrieved using the Search box. This will search through the entire list of FAQ entries (in the Title and the Body) and will return results based on a match based on the words you input. If you wish, you may enter complete questions, e.g. "What currency would we use in an independent Scotland".

Will an independent Scotland sign the Treaty on the Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT)?

Yes. It is the present Scottish Government’s priority, as a good global citizen, to support and promote nuclear disarmament. That is the right thing for any responsible government to do. We look forward to the opportunity for Scotland to add our name to those states that have ratified the Treaty, and to take forward our obligations in creating the conditions for a world without nuclear weapons.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Would you sign/ratify the NPT if/while Trident nuclear weapons were still based at Faslane?

Yes. We have made a clear commitment to secure the speediest safe withdrawal of Trident from Scotland following independence.

Scotland’s ratification of the NPT will not rely on the detailed arrangements for the withdrawal of Trident..

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

Would the removal of Trident from Scotland result in its decommissioning?

It is the Scottish Government’s preference to see Trident decommissioned, but that will be a matter for the government of the rest of the UK.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.

How long will it take to remove Trident from Scotland and who will bear the cost?

Nuclear weapons have been based in Scotland for almost half a century, despite the long-standing majority opposition of the people of Scotland. In addition, Scottish taxpayer contributions to Trident spending could support many more public sector jobs in Scotland than the weapons system currently brings to the Clyde, and every year therefore Scotland loses out because of the continuance of Trident nuclear weapons.

The detailed process and timetable for removal would be a priority for negotiation between the Scottish Government and the government of the rest of the UK. However, following a vote for independence, we would make early agreement on removal of nuclear weapons a priority. This would be with a view to the removal of Trident within the first term of the Scottish Parliament following independence.

Source: Scotland's Future, Scottish Government, November 2013.